It is our goal to keep your mouth healthy, your teeth fully functional, and your smile bright — and we are proud of all the services we offer to do exactly that. At the same time, we want you to understand all that modern dentistry in general has to offer you. To that end, we have assembled a first-rate dental library in which you can find a wealth of information on various dental topics, including:

Stamford, CT | Root Canal Treatment

Cosmetic & General Dentistry

From a thorough professional cleaning to a full smile makeover, there is an amazing array of services that cosmetic and general dentists offer to make sure your teeth stay healthy, function well and look great. If your smile is not all you want it to be, this is the place to start. Read more about Cosmetic & General Dentistry.

Root Canal Treatment | Stamford, CT

Emergency Dental Care

When you have a dental emergency — whether it's caused by a sudden accident or chronic disease — your teeth and/or the tissues of the mouth that surround them need to receive proper care right away. It's also important to be aware, before you're actually in the situation, of what you can do to ensure the best outcome. Read more about Emergency Dental Care.

Greenwich, CT | Root Canal Treatment

Endodontics

This is the branch of dentistry that focuses on the inside of the tooth — specifically the root canals and sensitive, inner pulp (nerve) tissue. When this tissue becomes inflamed or infected, a root canal procedure may become necessary. But contrary to the popular myth, a root canal doesn't cause pain, it relives it. Read more about Endodontics.

Root Canal Treatment | Greenwich, CT

Implant Dentistry

If you are missing one or more teeth, dental implants offer the comfort and security of a permanent replacement that looks and functions just like your natural teeth. Dental implants also help preserve the tooth-supporting bone in your jaw that naturally deteriorates when even one tooth is lost. Read more about Implant Dentistry.

Oral Health

Oral Health

Oral health is an essential component of general health and well-being. Good oral health means a mouth that's free of disease; a bite that functions well enough for you to eat without pain and get ample nutrition; and a smile that lets you express your happiest emotions with confidence. Read more about Oral Health.

Oral Hygiene

Oral Hygiene

A major goal of modern dentistry is to help you keep your teeth and gums healthy for a lifetime. By following a conscientious program of oral hygiene at home, and coming to the dental office for routine cleanings and exams, you have the best chance of making this goal a reality. Read more about Oral Hygiene.

Oral Surgery

Oral Surgery

The word “surgery” often brings to mind a stay in the hospital, general anesthesia, and perhaps a lengthy recovery period. However, the experience of having oral surgery is usually very different from that. Some common oral surgery procedures include: tooth extractions, dental implant placement, and biopsies of suspicious oral lesions. Read more about Oral Surgery.

Orthodontics

Orthodontics

Adults and kids alike can benefit from the boost in self-confidence that comes from having a great-looking smile with beautifully aligned teeth. Orthodontic treatment can even improve chewing, speaking and oral hygiene in certain cases. And with today's virtually invisible orthodontic appliances, it's possible to keep your treatment a private matter… until your new smile is unveiled, of course! Read more about Orthodontics.

Pediatric Dentistry

Pediatric Dentistry

It's never too early to get your child started on the path toward a lifetime of good oral health, and there are many services to do exactly that. Monitoring your child's dental growth and development, and preventing and intercepting dental diseases along the way, is the primary focus of pediatric dentistry. Read more about Pediatric Dentistry.

Periodontal Therapy

Periodontal Therapy

If you want to keep your teeth for life — a completely reasonable goal in this day and age — you need to make sure the tissues that surround them are also healthy. Should gum problems arise, you may need periodontal therapy to restore diseased tissues to health. Read more about Periodontal Therapy.

Technology

Technology

In the field of dentistry, new technology is constantly changing the way diseases are diagnosed, routine procedures are performed, and illnesses are prevented. Although they may seem unfamiliar at first, new and improved dental technologies offer plenty of real benefits for patients. Read more about Technology.

Many of us at one time or another confront a minor dental emergency such as a children's knocked out tooth or a bitten lip or tongue. Common sense and staying calm should get you through most of these kinds of dental emergencies. Here are some other tips:

Toothaches

Rinse your mouth out with warm water to clean out any debris or foreign matter. Gently use dental floss or an inter-dental cleaner to ensure that there is no food or other debris caught between your teeth.

Some people try placing an aspirin or other kind of pain killer on a painful tooth, but this is not a sound practice. These kinds of substances can actually burn your gum tissue.

Broken, fractured, displaced tooth

For a broken tooth, rinse your mouth out with warm water to clean out any debris or foreign matter. Use a cold compress on your cheek or gum near the affected area to keep any swelling down. Call your dentist immediately.

If a tooth is fractured, rinse mouth with warm water and use an ice pack or cold compress to reduce swelling. Use ibuprofen, not aspirin, for pain. Immediately contact your dentist.

Minor fractures can be smoothed by the dentist with a sandpaper disc or simply left alone. Another option is to restore the tooth with a composite restoration. In either case, treat the tooth with care for several days.

Moderate fractures include damage to the enamel, dentin and/or pulp. If the pulp is not permanently damaged, the tooth may be restored with a full permanent crown. If pulp damage does occur, further dental treatment will be required.

Severe fractures often mean a traumatized tooth with a slim chance of recovery.

Quick action can save a knocked out tooth, prevent infection, and reduce the need for extensive dental treatment. Rinse the mouth with water and apply cold compresses to reduce swelling. Retrieve the tooth by the crown ? not by the root. If you are unable to replace the tooth easily in its socket, place it in a container with a lid filled with low-fat milk, saline solution, or saliva. Visit the dentist or the emergency room as soon as possible.

If your babyâ¿¿s tooth is knocked out, see your dentist, who may recommend a space maintainer to reserve the gap until the permanent tooth comes in. In instances where a primary tooth is loose because of the emergence of a permanent tooth, have the child wiggle the tooth or eat something hard, such as an apple to help it along. Once the shell of the tooth is disconnected from the root, the discomfort in extracting a loose primary tooth is minimal.

Follow these simple first aid steps for a tooth that has been either knocked loose or knocked out:

  • If a tooth is displaced, push it back into its original position and bite down so the tooth does not move.
  • Call your dentist or visit the emergency room. The dentist may splint the tooth in place between the two healthy teeth next to the loose tooth.
  • If the tooth is completely knocked out, pick the tooth up by the crown - not by the root, as handling the root may damage the cells necessary for bone reattachment and hinder the replant. If the tooth can not be replaced in its socket, do not let the tooth dry out. Place it in a container with a lid filled with low-fat milk, saline solution, or saliva. Visit the dentist as soon as possible -the longer the tooth is out of the mouth, the less likely the tooth will be able to be saved.

    Sports injuries

    According to the Academy of General Dentistry, many sports-related emergencies involving teeth can be avoided by following the rules and remembering dental first aid steps.

    Common swimming pool accidents occur when children, swimming underwater, quickly ascend to the surface, hitting the hard ledge, and loosening the front tooth. Running on slippery, slick cement and ceramic pool surfaces also can send your child headfirst into the ground, increasing the likelihood of a chipped or loose tooth.

    Bitten lip or tongue

    Clean the area gently with a cloth and apply cold compresses or ice to reduce swelling. If the bleeding doesn't stop, go to a hospital emergency room immediately.

    Trapped debris, objects between teeth

    Try gently removing the debris with dental floss. Be careful not to cut your gums. Never use a sharp instrument such as a needle or pin to remove any object that is stuck between your teeth. If you can't dislodge the object using dental floss, contact your dentist.


Contact Us

Philip J. Bauer, DMD & Associates

Endodontist in Stamford, CT
Philip J. Bauer, DMD & Associates
125 Strawberry Hill Avenue
Stamford, CT 06902
(203) 327-1613
Endodontist in Stamford, CT Call For Pricing Options!

Endodontist in Greenwich, CT
Philip J. Bauer, DMD & Associates
23 Maple Ave
Greenwich, CT 06830
(203) 661-3277
Endodontist in Greenwich, CT Call For Pricing Options!